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hit by threatening to cut jobs and working hours as a way to deal with the new healthcare law. darden restaurant group, owner of the olive garden and red lobster, just cut its profit forecast for the year, specifically citing failed promotions and the pr problem it encountered after admitting to limiting employee hours. under the affordable care act, companies with more than 50-full time employees are required to offer basic health coverage for workers or face a fine. other restaurant chains have also generated backlash after publicly complaining about obamacare. "i think the point is that the restaurant industry shouldn't expect to be able to have this advantageous position relative to many other industries that employ a lot of people and do pay healthcare benefits. and, quite frankly, it is the law, so we'll all have to deal with it and manage through it. that was restaurant consultant bob goldin of technomic. darden shares were down 10% yesterday. the founder of software company autonomy is on the defense. this week, autonomy founder mike lynch launched a website addressing allegat
's case. the call is scheduled ahead of the market open. there are laws against discrimination by employers, but what about mid-level managers who don't hire and fire but can make an employee's work day miserable because of race, religion, sex or age? in our cover story, the supreme court is weighing that in vance v. ball state, a ruling that could bring mistreatment on the job a step closer to being shown the door. in 1989, ball state university hired maetta vance to work in the school's dining department. for 16 years, she was the department's only african- american employee and, according to court documents, was regularly subjected to racial ephithets from co- workers, including those who oversaw what she did each day. "those are the people who workers feel they can't confront if they're being harassed." the university issued a statement saying racially- charged remarks would not be tolerated. despite a series of reprimands, the abuse continued. ultimately, vance sued her employer, the university, and her case has led to the supreme court. this week, justices heard oral argu
in the nation. the national employment law project finds that 2/3 of workers earning less than $10 an hour are employed by large corporations with net incomes in the billions. the study ranked corporations by the largest low-wage workforce and the companies' profitability. walmart topped the list with 1.4 million employees and income near 15.7 billion. the company has been scrutinized for low wages and poor insurance benefits. other companies topping the list were yum brands, mcdonald's, target and sears. u.s. car sales are back on track after hurricane sandy disrupted the pace. dealership showrooms are busy again with people forced to buy cars demolished by the storm, and consumers are feeling more confident about the economy. at ford, sales were up 6.5%. gm reported a 3.4% hike in sales, while at chrysler, a 14% boost was reported. joe wiesenfelder of cars.com says due to superstorm sandy, the numbers may continue to roll in positive for months to come. "some of what we are seeing is probably deferred purchases in november from that period of the storm itself. gains were also reported am
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